Protesters on both sides of the abortion debate line up outside the Mississippi Capitol

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Days after the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision that overturned Roe v. Wade, protesters from both sides of the abortion issue lined up outside the Mississippi State Capitol. The protest was originally organized by the Socialism and Liberation Party, but some anti-abortion protesters also showed up to make their voices heard. The decision was in response to Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, which under state trigger law is set to close on July 7. But a legal expert said Mississippi’s latest abortion clinic may stay open longer than expected. My initial view is that the lawsuit has merit,” said Matt Steffey, a professor at the Mississippi College School of Law. According to the lawsuit, the trigger law violates the state’s constitution, which has an implied right to privacy, including the right to abortion.” Until the case is overturned, any laws prohibiting abortion, such as the six-week ban in the trigger law, would appear to be in conflict,” Steffey said. Steffey said there was a problem with that argument. The 24-year-old Mississippi Supreme Court ruling attorneys pin their hopes on Roe v. Wade, which the U.S. Supreme Court ruled unconstitutional. “And I guess the state will argue that this case really isn’t good law. Now that Roe has been reconsidered, the Mississippi Supreme Court should reconsider its understanding of the state constitution,” Steffey said. think the facility could remain open for months while the case progresses through the courts. Supreme Court of Mississippi, I am deeply skeptical that this will remain the law of our state,” he said. All four Hinds County Chancery court judges recused themselves.

Days after the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision that overturned Roe v. Wade, protesters from both sides of the abortion issue lined up outside the Mississippi State Capitol.

The protest was originally organized by the Socialism and Liberation Party, but some anti-abortion protesters also showed up to make their voices heard.

The decision was in response to Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, which under state trigger law is scheduled to close on July 7. But a legal expert said Mississippi’s latest abortion clinic may stay open longer than expected.

Lawyers representing the Jackson clinic have filed a lawsuit to stop the trigger law, which bans most abortions in Mississippi.

“My initial view is that the lawsuit has merit,” said Matt Steffey, a professor at Mississippi College School of Law.

According to the lawsuit, the trigger law violates the state constitution, which has an implied right to privacy, including the right to abortion.

“Until the case is overturned, any law prohibiting abortion, as the six-week ban does in the trigger law, would appear to be in conflict,” Steffey said.

Steffey said there was a problem with that argument. The 24-year-old Mississippi Supreme Court ruling attorneys pin their hopes on Roe v. Wade, which the U.S. Supreme Court ruled unconstitutional.

“And I guess the state will argue that this case really isn’t good law. Now that Roe has been reconsidered, the Mississippi Supreme Court should revisit its understanding of the state constitution,” Steffey said.

Steffey thinks the establishment could remain open for months while the case progresses through the courts.

“But once it gets to the Mississippi Supreme Court, I’m deeply skeptical that it will remain the law of our state,” he said.

All four Hinds County Chancery Court judges recused themselves.

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